Argument for Scientists – Alaska

Hello folks, and thanks for being such a great class! As promised, here are the PowerPoints and notes from our class discussions. This page is marked “private,” so please bookmark this link. You cannot reach it through my website. And please do not share it with anyone who was not in the training. (It won’t make much sense to them anyway!)

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PowerPoint Presentations:

Day One

Day Two

Day Three

Day Four

Day Five

In-Class Discussions:

Course Expectations

Course Expectations

Consider comparing your expectations with both the lessons learned and your notes from various modules. In this way, you will learn how to continually apply the course to your own work.

Lessons Learned

Lessons Learned 1

Our daily reviews. (Looks like I missed a couple!)

 

Lessons Learned 2

Our daily reviews. (Looks like I missed a couple!)

Technical Writing

Technical Writing

Characteristics we associate with technical, or scientific, writing.

Argument

Argument

While these are pretty negative, stereotypical concepts of argument, they describe some of the tasks in which we engage when we write persuasively. Remember to combine these with the technical writing concepts and use the modules in the notebook to write persuasively in ways that remain scientific, technical, and legally defensible.

Document Types

Document Types

These are just a few of the types of documents we identified as having both scientific and persuasive components.

Tones

Tones

Tones: We discussed a number of different tones we could reasonably adopt as environmental scientist working for the federal government. Then, we talked about the ways these tones could be perceived positively or negatively. Obviously, we want to strive for the positive!

Comparison Contrast

Comparison Contrast

When preparing a comparison-contrast, start by brainstorming a focused set of descriptions for ONE of the two items. Do the same for the second. Then consider how to describe the similarities, also known as categories. Use the advice given in the PowerPoint for organizing the results in either a point-by-point or a block fashion.

Sample Causal Chains and Scenarios

Sample Causal Chains and Scenarios

Before writing about causal relationships, break them down into their component parts. We used the chart on p. 11-2 to assess two situations. Remember that scenarios are characterized by having many and similar, often identical, sets of conditions and incidental causes. Remember, too, that when you write the analysis, begin with either the ultimate effect or primary cause, whichever is more important given the elements of your Writer’s Triangle.

Probability Table

Probability Table

To help assess and convey our degree of uncertainty, define the terms we use in our documents, such as “possible” or “likely.” Be sure to include a narrative explaining the meaning for each term and the methods the team used to arrive at the meaning.